Python for Analytics

Python started out as a general purpose language when it was created in 1991 by Guido van Rossum. It was embraced early on by Google founders Sergei Brin and Larry Page ("Python where we can, C++ where we must" was reputedly their mantra). In 2006,…

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Course Spotlight: Deep Learning

Deep learning is essentially "neural networks on steroids" and it lies at the core of the most intriguing and powerful applications of artificial intelligence. Facial recognition (which you encounter daily in Facebook and other social media) harnesses many levels of data science tools, including algorithms…

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Course Spotlight: Structural Equation Modelling (SEM)

SEM stands for "structural equation modeling," and we are fortunate to have Prof. Randall Schumacker teaching this subject at Statistics.com. Randy created the Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) journal in 1994 and the Structural Equation Modeling Special Interest Group (SIG) at the American Educational Research Association…

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Benford’s Law Applies to Online Social Networks

Fake social media accounts and Russian meddling in US elections have been in the news lately, with Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook founder) testifying this week before the US Congress. Dr. Jen Golbeck, who teaches Network Analysis at Statistics.com, published an ingenious way to determine whether a…

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The Real Facebook Controversy

Cambridge Analytica's wholesale scraping of Facebook user data is big news now, and people are shocked that personal data is being shared and traded on a massive scale on the internet. But the real issue with social media is not harming to individual users whose…

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Masters Programs versus an Online Certificate in Data Science from Statistics.com

We just attended the analytics conference of INFORMS' (The Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) this week in Baltimore, and they held a special meeting for directors of academic analytics programs to better align what universities are producing with what industry is seeking.…

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Course Spotlight: Likert scale assessment surveys

Do you work with multiple choice tests, or Likert scale assessment surveys? Rasch methods help you construct linear measures from these forms of scored observations and analyze the results from such surveys and tests. "Practical Rasch Measurement - Core Topics" In this course, you will…

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Course Spotlight: Customer Analytics in R

"The customer is always right" was the motto Selfridge's department store coined in 1909. "We'll tell the customer what they want" was Madison Avenue's mantra starting in the 1950's. Now data scientists like Karolis Urbonas help companies like Amazon (where he works in Europe as…

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Course Spotlight: Spatial Statistics Using R

Have you ever needed to analyze data with a spatial component? Geographic clusters of disease, crimes, animals, plants, events?Or describing the spatial variation of something, and perhaps correlating it with some other predictor? Assessing whether the geographic distribution of something departs from randomness? Location data…

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“Money and Brains” and “Furs and Station Wagons”

"Money and Brains" and "Furs and Station Wagons" were evocative customer shorthands that the marketing company Claritas came up with over a half century ago. These names, which facilitated the work of marketers and sales people, were shorthand descriptions of segments of customers identified through…

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Course Spotlight: Text Mining

The term text mining is sometimes used in two different meanings in computational statistics: Using predictive modeling to label many documents (e.g. legal docs might be "relevant" or "not relevant") - this is what we call text mining. Using grammar and syntax to parse the…

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